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Pellaken1
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posted 29 October 2004 06:14 PM      Profile for Pellaken1     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
here are the results of the afghanistan presidential election


http://www.afg-electionresults.org/english/english.htm

Hamid Karzai - 55.40% - (Yellowish on map)
Yonous Qanooni - 16.30% - (Green on map)
Haji Mohammad Mohaqiq - 11.60% - (Purple on map)
Abdul Rashid Dostum - 10.00% - (Blue on map)
All Others Combined - 6.70% -


From: Gritland | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 29 October 2004 06:42 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Thank you, Pellaken. That is a most interesting map.

Must read up on Qanooni. He is obviously the inheritor of Ahmed Shah Massoud, who ended up leader of the so-called Northern Alliance (assassinated days before 9/11) but was before that, during the Soviet occupation, known as the Lion of the Panjshir. That is a concentrated and well-organized culture up there.

Unfortunately, we know too much about Dostum already.

Interesting to see which parts of the country Karzai has managed to pacify, or whatever it is he does.

Anyway, thanks, Pellaken. We haven't been paying enough attention to this lately.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 29 October 2004 06:58 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
One thing is shows, if it shows anything, is are how concentrated the local power structures are. Dostum coming in with 75% in Uzbek territory. The same with the area just to the north of kabul, Bamyan, a culturally distinct area that has often been a problem for the power in Kabul. It was once a powerful Bhuddist center.

The map does not show that Afghanistan is a unified politcal entity, and has serious concentrated areas of opposition based on traditional power structures. The Pashtu power in Kabul rules the Pashtu areas, and the other tribes continue in opposition. It is not integrated. The revoltion in Afghan politcs, is not one.

More of the same.

[Edited to Add] Oh wait, it seems that Karazi has some influence around Herat, although this may be because anti Karazi forces may have boycotted the process, or been unable to participate due to recent fighting. Note: Ismahail Khan is not on the list of official candidates.

Afghanistan - Introduction

quote:
March 2004 witnessed violence in western Herat province as fighting began on 21 March between forces loyal to the regional warlord Ismail Khan and Afghan army units under General Abdul Zahir Nayebzadeh, who professes loyalty to Karzai's administration. The clashes, which involved tanks and mortars, occurred after an unsuccessful assassination attempt against Khan. Gunmen killed the warlord's son, Mirwai Sadeq a few hours later. Sadeq was the minister of civil aviation and tourism in Karzai's cabinet. Khan loyalists blamed Nayebzadeh for the incidents, accusing the general of trying to overthrow the regional leadership. On March 22nd the central government dispatched a 1500-strong force headed by Defense Minister Mohammad Fahim to restore order in the region. He established a cease-fire that would allow for a full investigation into the circumstances surrounding Sadeq's death, and sought Khan's support for the central government. The next day around 1500 Afghan National Army soldiers had been deployed to Herat with the promise of more troops to "ensure security, prevent regional clashes and show the presence of the central government in Herat province." The entry of Afghan National Army troops into Herat marked the first time since the demise of the Taliban in late 2001 that Kabul had forces in Ismail Khan's province.

Khan is one of many regional warlords who have been acting independently of central government control since the fall of the Taliban. Despite a May 2003 pledge to recognize the preeminence of the central government and promises to adhere to the chain of command, Khan and others, including ethnic Uzbek leader Abdul Rashid Dostum, have largely disregarded Kabul. The lack of governmental cohesion is an underlying cause of the instability that plagues Afghanistan and threatens the nation's future. On July 14th, Karzai signed a decree pledging to crack down on warlords and militia commanders who resist the internationally backed process of Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration program, also known as DDR.


[ 29 October 2004: Message edited by: Cueball ]


From: Out from under the bridge and out for a stroll | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Pellaken1
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posted 29 October 2004 09:10 PM      Profile for Pellaken1     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I found it interesting that the areas with lots of american troops, voted for Karzai by over 90%...
From: Gritland | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Pellaken1
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posted 29 October 2004 09:11 PM      Profile for Pellaken1     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:

Unfortunately, we know too much about Dostum already.

oh?


From: Gritland | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 29 October 2004 09:29 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
He is the last pirate.
From: Out from under the bridge and out for a stroll | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
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posted 30 October 2004 09:40 AM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
One of the Dostum stories that I can't get out of my mind: he used to enjoy executing people by tying them to the tracks of tanks ...

I noticed Herat, and no Ismail Khan. I also was puzzled a bit by that northern border -- what is Karzai doing there in the middle, and how does Dostum's writ run that far east? Do the Americans have troops stationed in Uzbekistan? They have an air base, yes?


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Wilf Day
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posted 30 October 2004 12:31 PM      Profile for Wilf Day     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by skdadl:
I noticed Herat, and no Ismail Khan.

Apparently he supported Qanooni.
Qanooni got 33.7% in Herat.


From: Port Hope, Ontario | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
Wilf Day
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posted 30 October 2004 12:57 PM      Profile for Wilf Day     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
After Karzai and the three regional strongmen comes Abdul Latif Pedram.

quote:
Poet and writer Abdul Latif Pedram electrified a lacklustre campaign by plunging into the marital politics of Islam: posing challenging questions about the right of Afghan men to have several wives and about women's divorce rights.

The reaction to his ideas was tectonic. . .

Pedram, 41, is no stranger to controversy. His open advocacy of federal government for Afghanistan has won him few friends among those who fear and resent such a plan. .

By raising such challenging question in Afghanistan's traditional thinking and strictly Islamic society, Pedram seems to be deliberately seeking to act as a catalyst for discussion, playing the role more of a classic intellectual . .

Born in the northern province in Badakshan, he first came to the capital in 1984. He studied literature at Kabul University, philosophy in Tehran and finally gained a doctorate in Islamic Studies in Paris at the Sorbonne.

Some allege that as he student he was involved with communism, editing the communist newspaper Haqiqat-e-Inqilab-e-Saur - The Truth of the Revolution. He hotly denies it.

"I have never written even for one second for the Democratic (Communist) Party and I didn't have an affiliation with them," he said. He concedes only that "during the communist era, I was in Kabul and involved in journalism affairs".

He is now spokesman for Hezb-e-Kangara-e-Millie (the National Congress Party) - a newcomer to the political scene in Afghanistan, established two years ago in Brussels by just 500 people and registered with the justice ministry earlier this summer.

He explained that while it is true that in Islam a man can take up to four wives, according to the Holy Koran, every wife should be treated justly and if a man cannot guarantee equal treatment of his wives, he is not allowed to take more than one.

Pedram questions whether a man can indeed treat more than one wife justly and equally.

Pedram's views on federal government are equally, if not more, challenging to some than his foray into women's politics - particularly some of the Pashtun majority.

Then he reels out a list of Pashtun provinces where his party has Pashtun supporters - Kandahar, Helmand, Logar and Jalalabad.

Turning to the current state of politics in Afghanistan, Pedram is scathing about the current interim president. "I have always called [President Hamed] Karzai a puppet of America and I call him that now," he said.


He got 14.1% in his native Badakhshan, and 4.7% in next-door Takhar. Unfortunately, he got only 2.7% in Kabul, running fourth.


From: Port Hope, Ontario | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
Cueball
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posted 30 October 2004 04:54 PM      Profile for Cueball   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
From the IHT article on Khan:

quote:
Unexpectedly, Amanullah's forces killed Ismail Khan's son (who was Karzai's minister of aviation) and overran Herat's main Shindand air base...

You have to love some journalists use of language. Suddenly out of the blue Khan's son was killed and air base was overun by the forces of nature, resulting in the US army finally making an unexpected appearance in Herat. Lovely.

Dostum's troops were the primary agent in the slaugheter of Taliban prisoners at that prison near Mazer e Sharif, where that CIA guy was killed right after the invasion began.

[ 30 October 2004: Message edited by: Cueball ]


From: Out from under the bridge and out for a stroll | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged

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