babble home
rabble.ca - news for the rest of us
today's active topics


Post New Topic  Post A Reply
FAQ | Forum Home
  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» babble   » walking the talk   » labour and consumption   » xmas tree...fake or real?

Email this thread to someone!    
Author Topic: xmas tree...fake or real?
Cartman
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7440

posted 14 December 2005 01:54 PM      Profile for Cartman        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
From an environmental standpoint, is it better to go for a real one or a fake one? I want a fakee, whereas my wife wants real.
From: Bring back Audra!!!!! | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
Nikita
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 9050

posted 14 December 2005 03:11 PM      Profile for Nikita     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I like the ones with the fibreoptic lights that change colours. *sigh* So mesmerizing and beautiful

Envrionmentally, I will hazard an uneducated guess and say that a fake tree is better in the longrun because it only has to be created once, while real trees are cut down every year but take many years to grow.


From: Regina | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
ronb
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2116

posted 14 December 2005 03:14 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well, your fake tree will end up in a land fill, while your real tree can end up as compost. I imagine a potted tree would be best.
From: gone | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
lagatta
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2534

posted 14 December 2005 03:41 PM      Profile for lagatta     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
No Christmas tree, but I've bought myself a nice ficus benjamina to look at some greenery.

His name is Fabrizio (thanks Skdadl). Hope he survives the winter...


From: Se non ora, quando? | Registered: Apr 2002  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 14 December 2005 03:49 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Not that I'm going to do this this year, but is it possible to buy a wee potted evergreen? One that might have a chance of surviving next year when transplanted?

It would be hard to turn that into an annual tradition, y'know. You'd end up with a forest in your wee postage-stamp very quickly.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
ronb
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2116

posted 14 December 2005 03:54 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
We have a substantial potted Blue Spruce, roughly 6 feet tall. Seems quite happy indoors all year.
From: gone | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 14 December 2005 03:57 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Where did you obtain it, ronb?
From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
ronb
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2116

posted 14 December 2005 03:59 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
It was a gift from a departing neighbour.
From: gone | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
Melsky
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4748

posted 14 December 2005 04:01 PM      Profile for Melsky   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I got a real one, it smells beautiful. They get composted in Toronto. I'd get one in a pot but I am a plant killer. The only thing I can seem to keep alive is bamboo in water.
From: Toronto | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 14 December 2005 04:04 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by ronb:
It was a gift from a departing neighbour.

Oh, my. I hope not a dear departed?

And speaking of the dear departed, Melsky, that is what happened to my li'l bamboo in water, all too quickly. I think I let it get too fetid or something. Anyway, it got green and slimy, and then it died. I guess you have to change the water, sort of like with fish?


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 14 December 2005 04:28 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I've gotten little evergreens [I forget the exact name; cedars?] from Ikea, but found they did not survive the heat of summer. Even a local greenhouse might have little potted trees.

About the bamboo plant; the one I gave my sister-in-law included a note that hedged all bets; it said the live plant was lucky, and if the plant died it meant that the plant had absorbed and removed all bad luck.


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Cartman
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7440

posted 14 December 2005 05:02 PM      Profile for Cartman        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Hey ronb, are you sure that your Blue Spruce is not actually a Norfolk Island Pine?
From: Bring back Audra!!!!! | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
Contrarian
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 6477

posted 14 December 2005 05:14 PM      Profile for Contrarian     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I have a Norfolk Island pine; lovely plant, but too delicate to hold a bunch of Christmas decorations. Also, it's happier if it gets misted often, which then makes ornaments unhappy.

[ 14 December 2005: Message edited by: Contrarian ]


From: pretty far west | Registered: Jul 2004  |  IP: Logged
Amy
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2210

posted 14 December 2005 05:18 PM      Profile for Amy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I was under the impression that one couldn't -- well, shouldn't anyway -- compost christmas trees because there was something in pinetrees that would prevent the bugs and worms and all that good stuff from getting in and decomposing your other organics. Has anyone else heard that?
From: the whole town erupts and/ bursts into flame | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
Sharon
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4090

posted 14 December 2005 05:21 PM      Profile for Sharon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
We always get a pre-ordered chemical-free tree through the Ecology Action Centre. They're beautiful trees.

On at least three different recycling days after Christmas, the city picks up trees and they're composted.

I have had artificial trees at certain times in my past. I think they're much nicer now than they used to be. My impression is that you can't see the twisted wire holding things together the way you used to be able to.

Our new kitten is still pretty young so any tree at all is going to be a challenge.


From: Halifax, Nova Scotia | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
mamitalinda
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5510

posted 14 December 2005 10:44 PM      Profile for mamitalinda   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Real! You can't duplicate that glorious smell. There is enough plastic in our lives as it is. Plus I love the carnivalesque element of bringing the outdoors in.
From: Babblers On Strike! | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
Amy
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2210

posted 14 December 2005 11:11 PM      Profile for Amy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Stupid allergies. That lovely smell is great (in small doses) outdoors, but inside my lungs and eyes just can't handle it.

I think me and my roomates are actually going to tack some butcher paper up and draw a tree, and decorate it by sticking hooks through the paper, painting it, etc. I'm working all through the holidays, and they're both headed to their parents, so anything more than that would be a little... overboard.


From: the whole town erupts and/ bursts into flame | Registered: Feb 2002  |  IP: Logged
scott
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 637

posted 19 December 2005 02:27 PM      Profile for scott   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
One of my most memorable trees was made by setting up an old projector screen.

Dont unroll the screen, but extend the rod at the back full height.

Get a string of mini-lights form a triangle between the top of the support rod and both ends of the screen roll.

Turn on.

Ten minutes and it was set up and decorated, and it looked great!

[ 19 December 2005: Message edited by: scott ]


From: Kootenays BC | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
The Hegemo
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5176

posted 19 December 2005 02:33 PM      Profile for The Hegemo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I can't have a real or fake one, because my kitties would just view it as a challenge to be overcome.
From: The Persistent Vegetative States of America | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
clersal
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 370

posted 19 December 2005 05:35 PM      Profile for clersal     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
I can't have a real or fake one, because my kitties would just view it as a challenge to be overcome.

Ah the days when the fake Christmas trees, the really tiny ones were super cheap. I got one about 2 feet high, all equipped with lights and hanging things.

Well the kittens were thrilled. They attacked, maimed and attempted to kill the tree. Well, they did maim it.All it's, or most of the little hanginging thingies have disappeared. Probably the vacuum clean got most of them. But the lights work and it takes 10 seconds to put up.


From: Canton Marchand, Qubec | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
Sharon
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4090

posted 19 December 2005 06:29 PM      Profile for Sharon     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Awww... I had one of those tiny trees. I really liked it. Putting coloured lights on just about anything creates an atmosphere.

We have a new kitten -- well, I guess he's about four months old by now -- but we've always had cats and kittens.

First rule: tie the tree securely to the wall with fishing line (strong and invisible.)(hnygnjku -- see this word? The kitten just walked across the keyboard.) Our tree is in a front window and there are permanent strong hooks on both sides of the window frames that the fishing line attaches to.

Second rule: no tinsel, of course.

Third rule: all unbreakable ornaments on the bottom half of the tree. Most of them will be on the floor in the morning but you just pick 'em up and put them back on the tree. Repeat daily, as required.


From: Halifax, Nova Scotia | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
skdadl
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 478

posted 19 December 2005 06:35 PM      Profile for skdadl     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I like Scott's projector screen. I don't have one of those, alas.

I do have a step-ladder sitting in the l-r, awaiting my return as painter. The step-ladder has a certain triangularity to it. I guess lights would make it happy ...

I need the faith, I guess. It's not that I couldn't put some lights up; it's more that I need the faith.


From: gone | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
ronb
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 2116

posted 19 December 2005 06:46 PM      Profile for ronb     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Hey ronb, are you sure that your Blue Spruce is not actually a Norfolk Island Pine?

I feel a bit like Rip Van Winkle responding to this lo these many moons later.

Perhaps it is. Are they Blue-ish in colour?


From: gone | Registered: Jan 2002  |  IP: Logged
Melsky
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 4748

posted 19 December 2005 06:51 PM      Profile for Melsky   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by skdadl:

Oh, my. I hope not a dear departed?

And speaking of the dear departed, Melsky, that is what happened to my li'l bamboo in water, all too quickly. I think I let it get too fetid or something. Anyway, it got green and slimy, and then it died. I guess you have to change the water, sort of like with fish?


I never change the water! I just add more water. Maybe I have just been lucky so far. I have managed to kill every other houseplant, though I can keep outdoor plants alive pretty good. Part of the problem is my cats though, it's not all me.


From: Toronto | Registered: Dec 2003  |  IP: Logged
Ferdzy
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 7758

posted 19 December 2005 07:47 PM      Profile for Ferdzy     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
This thread reminds me! Time to get out the ornaments and decorate the jade plant.
From: Small Town Ontario | Registered: Dec 2004  |  IP: Logged
Pimji
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 228

posted 20 December 2005 12:02 AM      Profile for Pimji   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Get a real tree. They are grown in Canada, not shipped a gazzilion miles and made from petrol products.

I would imagine that even farmed trees would have better byproducts than plastic.

People can even go to a "cut yer own". It's kinda fun and supports the local economy, at least a little bit.


From: South of Ottawa | Registered: Apr 2001  |  IP: Logged
nuclearfreezone
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 9059

posted 20 December 2005 12:31 AM      Profile for nuclearfreezone     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
This year I decorated my garden screen just outside our side door. It has lights and hanging decorations on it. Looks real cool at night when all the other lights are turned off.

I'm making a Christmas tree out of a string of white lights, just behind the dining room table. I plan on hanging decorations on that too.

I always had a real tree in the past and would then recycle it into my backyard firepit in the summer. But this year I am too cheap (ok broke) and since I no longer have a vehicle and my kids are teens now, I opted to not get one.

I kinda miss a tree but the garden screen and the light tree on the wall have their own ambience too. No mess afterwards either doing it this way. Those pine needles all over the place after Christmas sometimes get to me, especially if you step on one in bare feet!

I know a family in Vancouver who recycle their tree every year. They keep the roots wrapped in burlap and put it back in the ground right after Christmas. 8 years now I hear! But I imagine that would be rather difficult if you lived in, say, Saskatchewan.


From: B.C. | Registered: Apr 2005  |  IP: Logged
James
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 5341

posted 20 December 2005 01:25 AM      Profile for James        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A "cut yer own", from a local Xmas tree farm. From there, a 1/2 km jaunt down the road to a winery to sample the wares and pick up some ice wine gifts, thence to the near deserted dining lounge of a nearby gilf course for warm-up brunch and caesars. A nice Saturday.
From: Windsor; ON | Registered: Mar 2004  |  IP: Logged
beibhnn
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 3178

posted 20 December 2005 10:39 AM      Profile for beibhnn     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
We've had real trees at Xmas after a hike onto a cousin's farm to cut our own which was fun. But the watering, and dogs knocking it over, and the vacuuming I could have done without.

My favourite memories are putting together the fake tree with my sister while listening to Mario Lanza Sings Christmas. As my father says every year, poems are made by fools like me, but only two girls home for the holidays can put together a tree. I prefer the factory made tree that has become such a familiar part of our routine.

The bigger question: what are your ornaments like? We belong to the school of thought that more is better, and everything we have ever incorporated into "ornament" status is a welcome guest on our tree. We fight over who gets to put up the piece of string that used to be a doll (now called "the headless baby"), the pipecleaner that is ostensibly shaped like a raindeer, beautiful pewter ornaments, the regular red balls, and a smattering of xmas themed decorations made by friends and family from 1975 to the present (all in varying condition). Whether the tree is from nature or the factory, a "real" tree to me is one that is such a hodge podge of memories and happiness.


From: in exile | Registered: Oct 2002  |  IP: Logged
Mr. Magoo
guilty-pleasure
Babbler # 3469

posted 20 December 2005 11:43 AM      Profile for Mr. Magoo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Over the years, living in an apartment, we've had a variety of substitutes including:

- decorated tropical plants
- a Ficus
- a minimalist wireframe monstrosity
- a 3-D cardboard mockup
- a rosemary cone
- a Norfolk Island Pine (that died)
- a small fibre-optic tree from IKEA
- etc.

This year, for the first time ever, it's a real tree, real sized! I thought for sure I'd either have to drive out to a parking lot in Etobicoke, or else pay $100, to get a real tree downtown. In fact, we wandered over to a fruit and veg stand on College, picked a nice little spruce, and paid $20 cash to take it home. I couldn't believe it. Ho ho ho.


From: `,_,`,_,,_,, | Registered: Dec 2002  |  IP: Logged

All times are Pacific Time  

Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic    Move Topic    Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
Hop To:

Contact Us | rabble.ca | Policy Statement

Copyright 2001-2008 rabble.ca