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Author Topic: Morning-after Pill - Pharmacist told to ask about your sexual activity
idontandwontevergolf
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posted 02 December 2005 08:41 AM      Profile for idontandwontevergolf     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Article in this morning's Toronto Star:

Link

(Hope I did the url thingy right.)

From the article:

quote:
The pharmacists' association immediately posted guidelines on its website. They include giving women a screening form to fill out that asks for personal identification, the time when they last had unprotected sex, the number of times they have had unprotected sex since their last menstrual period, and what form of birth control they use. The information should be stored in the pharmacy's computer, the guidelines state.

quote:
Pharmacists are also charging a "counselling fee" of about $20 on top of $20 for the pill, putting it out of reach for many women, she said. The fee is government-paid only in Quebec, Saskatchewan and British Columbia.

I'm of two minds about this. I realize that pharmacists are healthcare professionals, and as such are required to maintain a certain amount of information about a client in order to do their job properly and dispense medications that will not harm the client but the prescription requirements for this medication were removed for a reason. But I ask for Tylenol with codeine (also a behind-the-counter drug) I don't have to receive counselling and provide the pharmacist with medical information.

I think that the pharmacist's concern over my sex life could be alleviated if they were to give out a handout to the client purchasing the morning-after-pill that gave safe-sex information.

The fact that they have been asked by their association to ask the above questions makes me wonder what they will do if the client's answers indicate to the pharmacist that the client is, in the pharmacist's eyes, irresponsible sexually. Will the pharmacist refuse to dispense the medication? Will you be forced to have counselling from the part-time pharmacist at Shopper's Drug Mart, someone with whom you do not really have a healthcare provider/client relationship with?

One saving grace, is that the Canadian Pharmacists Association, the ones making the recommendation, is not the regulatory body and cannot require pharmacists to do this - the respective provincial Colleges of Pharmacists would have to do this.


From: Between two highways | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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posted 02 December 2005 08:51 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Very interesting! Thanks for posting this.
From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
idontandwontevergolf
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posted 02 December 2005 08:59 AM      Profile for idontandwontevergolf     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Link

To the pharmacists association website page where all of their advice re ECP (emergency contraceptive...) is given.


From: Between two highways | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
kuri
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posted 02 December 2005 09:01 AM      Profile for kuri   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Are pharmacists subject to any privacy restrictions, like doctors are? Where is this information held? Will is be used for purposes other than that stated and what are the guarantees that it won't be?

Those are the questions that worry me about such things.

quote:
Will you be forced to have counselling from the part-time pharmacist at Shopper's Drug Mart, someone with whom you do not really have a healthcare provider/client relationship with?

This would be ridiculous. Pharmacists are not trained to be counsellors. They are only qualified to counsel about the drugs they prescribe, potential interactions, etc. They aren't doctors and they aren't psychologists.

Really scary. Thanks for posting this, non-golfer.


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Clog-boy
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posted 02 December 2005 09:02 AM      Profile for Clog-boy   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
If you ask me, those pharmacists have got no business in screening someone's sex-life.
Maybe a pharmacist could try a give some advise if someone were to walk into the pharmacy for morning after pills on a regular base. But then it would still only be advise, no inquiry about the customer/patient's sex-life should be made.

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idontandwontevergolf
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posted 02 December 2005 09:19 AM      Profile for idontandwontevergolf     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Theoretically, pharmacists are required to maintain confidentiality to the same degree that physicians are, as would the pharmacy assistants/technicians. However, given the nature of most pharmacies in large, urban centres in particular, (owned by corporations, ten pharmacists and several pharmacy technicians, limited private areas in which to talk to the pharmacist, staff that come and go and work part-time, etc.) the potential for this sensitive information to be read by a gazillion people is real. Although, I would assume that access to the computer is restricted to the pharmacists and the technicians - hopefully the checkout clerk helping out at the pharmacy desk cannot access the computer.
From: Between two highways | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
smartone
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posted 02 December 2005 09:24 AM      Profile for smartone   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
This is very disturbing. Why do Pharmacists believe most women cannot read?? The instructions should be enclosed.

For goodness sake, when was the last time they made a man fill in a form with such personal questions when they purchase condoms -

Women are not capable of taking a pill but every male knows how to put on a condom?? Geez!


From: Quebec | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged
kuri
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posted 02 December 2005 09:25 AM      Profile for kuri   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Actually, I'd the say the potential damage this could do in a small town would be quite bad as well. People overhear and people talk. Especially in atmospheres where everyone knows everyone else. I can totally see some "well-meaning" small town pharmacist contacting the parents of a teenager who accesses the morning after pill, for example. Or some other "well-meaning" person who overhears. Small town pharmacies don't really have private areas to talk in either generally.

edited: typo

[ 02 December 2005: Message edited by: kurichina ]


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idontandwontevergolf
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posted 02 December 2005 09:34 AM      Profile for idontandwontevergolf     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
the potential damage this could do in a small town would be quite bad as well

I agree, but thought to myself that if I lived in a small town the last thing I would do is go to the pharmacist who knows my mom (or worse my husband or boyfriend) to get this med. Though, given the necessity of taking this pill within days of unprotected intercourse one maybe forced to use the local pharmacist and this is certainly a barrier.


From: Between two highways | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
Wilf Day
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posted 02 December 2005 09:38 AM      Profile for Wilf Day     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by kurichina:
Snall town pharmacies don't really have private areas to talk in either generally.

Agreed. This is a terrible idea. (Although in fact, I expect a woman wanting this pill would drive a few miles to a store where the person in line behind her would be a stranger.)
quote:
Originally posted by kurichina:
Pharmacists are not trained to be counsellors.

Actually I thought they were. For example, if they spot the fact that you are already on a medication which could interact with your new one, they should warn you, and if there are instructions on the bottle about when not to take the medication, they should give them orally too for the benefit of those who don't read English well.

But I still think this is a terrible idea.


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rinne
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posted 02 December 2005 09:57 AM      Profile for rinne     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Shades of Dobson!

This is totally outrageous and it is clear that it will mostly humiliate those who are most vulnerable.

I think groups of women should form lines at these pharmacy counters and speak loudly, do you mean you want to know when I last had SEX? I suspect it wouldn't take many of these events hitting the papers to change things. Where are the Raging Grannies?


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kuri
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posted 02 December 2005 10:04 AM      Profile for kuri   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Wilf Day:
I expect a woman wanting this pill would drive a few miles to a store where the person in line behind her would be a stranger.

If she has a car. A good number of teenagers do not.

quote:
Originally posted by Wilf Day:
For example, if they spot the fact that you are already on a medication which could interact with your new one, they should warn you, ...

I got the impression that "counselling" here meant lifestyle and psychological counselling. I understand (and stated in my post) that they can give information about "the drugs they prescribe, potential interactions, etc." I'm worried about the idea that pharmacists are potentially being asked to counsel women about their sex lifes.


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Nikita
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posted 02 December 2005 10:08 AM      Profile for Nikita     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Wilf Day:

Actually I thought they were. For example, if they spot the fact that you are already on a medication which could interact with your new one, they should warn you, and if there are instructions on the bottle about when not to take the medication, they should give them orally too for the benefit of those who don't read English well.

But that's not quite the same as the pharmacist asking rather personal and, IMHO unnecessary questions about sexual history. If a pharmacist sees that a client's medications could interact and cause illness or further health issues, of course they need to speak up.

I went through this two years ago when I had to go to a pharmacy for ECP. She asked me all kinds of questions that went beyond the ones outlined above - not only when I last had sex but where it took place, which sexual positions we engaged in, how the condom broke, what kind of condoms, etc, in the middle of a crowded Shopper's. It was the most humilating, frustrating experience of my life.

edit: cross posting with kurichina!

[ 02 December 2005: Message edited by: Nikita ]


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kuri
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posted 02 December 2005 10:14 AM      Profile for kuri   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Nikita, that's horrible! I almost think I'd walk out if I was asked that. But then, when you need ECP, there's really no time and no alternative.
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Nikita
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posted 02 December 2005 10:27 AM      Profile for Nikita     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Exactly. The whole episode turned me off the entire medical profession for a long time.
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Bobolink
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posted 02 December 2005 10:45 AM      Profile for Bobolink   Author's Homepage        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by smartone:
This is very disturbing. Why do Pharmacists believe most women cannot read?? The instructions should be enclosed.

For goodness sake, when was the last time they made a man fill in a form with such personal questions when they purchase condoms -

Women are not capable of taking a pill but every male knows how to put on a condom?? Geez!


As anyone in the health care industry can tell you, people just don't read the package insert that comes with their medications. My experience with Scarleteen backs this up. Kids buy ECP and then don't read the instructions on use.

As a hormone, absorbed by the body, the ECP can have dangerous and possibly lethal side effects in some women. I am thinking here of women who cannot take regular oral contraception because of health problems (hypertension, smoking, etc.). The only real side effect with condoms is latex allergy that some men and women have. And, yes, people who buy condoms don't read the package insert either.

[ 02 December 2005: Message edited by: Bobolink ]


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Wilf Day
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posted 02 December 2005 10:48 AM      Profile for Wilf Day     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by kurichina:
I understand (and stated in my post) that they can give information about "the drugs they prescribe, potential interactions, etc."

Oops. Sorry.

I just sympathize with those pharmacists who, when doctors say they don't want a pharmacist educating their patients and possibly telling them something the doctor didn't, respond "I didn't get a pharmacy degree in order to be a dispensing machine."


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Nikita
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posted 02 December 2005 10:53 AM      Profile for Nikita     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
As anyone in the health care industry can tell you, people just don't read the package insert that comes with their medications. My experience with Scarleteen backs this up. Kids buy ECP and then don't read the instructions on use.

As a hormone, absorbed by the body, the ECP can have dangerous and possibly lethal side effects in some women. I am thinking here of women who cannot take regular oral contraception because of health problems (hypertension, smoking, etc.). The only real side effect with condoms is latex allergy that some men and women have. And, yes, people who buy condoms don't read the package insert either.


Again, there is a difference between informing someone about the health risks attached to a medication and the interrogation associated with emergency contraception.

I sound like such a grump! But I resent the fact that there is this large section of health care professionals who want to objectify women in this way.

[ 02 December 2005: Message edited by: Nikita ]


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kuri
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posted 02 December 2005 10:59 AM      Profile for kuri   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Wilf Day:

Oops. Sorry.

I just sympathize with those pharmacists who, when doctors say they don't want a pharmacist educating their patients and possibly telling them something the doctor didn't, respond "I didn't get a pharmacy degree in order to be a dispensing machine."


No worries. I understand that pharmacy is a science and there are things on which they can be more up to speed, but I just don't want pharmacists to be psychologists (nor would I want physicians to be psychologists... or psychologists to be pharmacists... )


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idontandwontevergolf
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posted 02 December 2005 11:03 AM      Profile for idontandwontevergolf     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
As anyone in the health care industry can tell you, people just don't read the package insert that comes with their medications. My experience with Scarleteen backs this up.

As a hormone, absorbed by the body, the ECP can have dangerous and possibly lethal side effects in some women. I am thinking here of women who cannot take regular oral contraception because of health problems (hypertension, smoking, etc.). The only real side effect with condoms is latex allergy that some men and women have. And, yes, people who buy condoms don't read the package insert either


True, but it's the consumer's responsibility to read the info and decide for herself. Allowing the consumer some autonomy/control over her reproduction is one of the reasons the medication was made easier to obtainin the first place. It is the pharmacist's responsibility to provide the info, full stop. Aspirin can have deadly side-effects too and is contraindicated with certain medication. Cold medications are contraindicated for use with some anti-depressants (MAOIs?) but the pharmacist doesn't quiz me on my use of antidepressants when I buy a cold medication.

Having said that, the pharmacists association's website indicates that research has not shown that taking this ECP is contraindicated when taken in conjunction with some other medications mentioned on the site. There are some cautionary statements though, but again, the pharmacist can tell this to the client, he/she does not need to hear about their sex life to provide this information.


From: Between two highways | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
idontandwontevergolf
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posted 02 December 2005 11:08 AM      Profile for idontandwontevergolf     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
As a hormone, absorbed by the body, the ECP can have dangerous and possibly lethal side effects in some women. I am thinking here of women who cannot take regular oral contraception because of health problems (hypertension, smoking, etc.).

But isn't the risk of hypertension and smoking while taking oral contraceptives a risk of long-term use? And those risk factors do not preclude the prescribing of the oral contraceptive and don't require knowledge of the client's sexual history.

The only lethal side effect that I can find in the literature I have read, is the possibility of anaphylactic shock and that cannot be predicted and can happen with any medication. I don't believe that there is a statisticallly significant risk of any lethal side effect with taking a one/two dose medication.


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fern hill
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posted 02 December 2005 12:01 PM      Profile for fern hill        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I had no idea this was going on.

Infantilizing, again. Invading privacy, again. Attempting to control, again. Humiliating, again.

OK, grils and womyn of babble, wot we gonna do?

Me, I'm going to write to the three groups mentioned in the Star article and I just looked up their addresses for that purpose and to pass them along here.

Canadian Pharmacists Association
1785 Alta Vista Dr.
Ottawa K1G 3T6
Janet Cooper [email protected]
[email protected]

Women and Health Protection
P.O. Box 291, Sta. Q
Toronto M4T 2M1
web page
[email protected]

Canadian Women's Health Network
Ste. 203, 419 Graham Ave.
Winnipeg R3C 0M3
web page
[email protected]

How bout we all go into our local drug stores and ask in a loud voice: "Anybody want to know about my sex life?" Then ask to speak to the head pharmacist and ask whether s/he "counsels" women asking for Plan B. What questions does s/he ask? If you don't like the answers, come back here and post the name and address of the store.


From: away | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
idontandwontevergolf
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posted 02 December 2005 12:14 PM      Profile for idontandwontevergolf     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Those are great ideas fern. Unfortunately, my sex life is rather obvious right now even to the casual observer (baby due coming Monday), so I think going to the pharmacy in person is out. But once he's out, I think I will try that. I will definitely write to the organizations though.
From: Between two highways | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
fern hill
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posted 02 December 2005 12:29 PM      Profile for fern hill        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Yes, idontandwont, now I remember, from another thread about 'sinning' . Greetings to the new member of your family.

As for the personal visit to the local pharmacy, you might make quite the impression right at the moment, being seen to defend women's rights to b.c.


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jariax
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posted 02 December 2005 12:39 PM      Profile for jariax        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
This is a blatant attempt to humiliate and discourage women from getting emergency contraceptives.

If someone can explain precisely how that information is going to be used, then I might think differently.

As for the mandatory counselling, it's a ridiculous concept - and certainly not something that anyone should have to pay for out of their own pocket.


From: toronto | Registered: Nov 2005  |  IP: Logged
idontandwontevergolf
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posted 02 December 2005 12:46 PM      Profile for idontandwontevergolf     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
As for the personal visit to the local pharmacy, you might make quite the impression right at the moment, being seen to defend women's rights to b.c.

That's true and seldom is a loud, angry pregnant woman ignored. But as of the last day or two, my ability to walk from my car to the mall has become compromised. Luckily, my computer, the washroom and my bed are all on the same floor of my house cuz the pressure on my pubic bone and surrounding area has become quite intense.


From: Between two highways | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
fern hill
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posted 02 December 2005 12:52 PM      Profile for fern hill        Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
idont, I didn't seriously expect you to take on something like that right now. But I was enjoying the mental image. . .
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kuri
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posted 03 December 2005 02:29 PM      Profile for kuri   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Thanks for collecting those addresses, fern. I think I'll send them snail-mails tomorrow.
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Tehanu
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posted 08 December 2005 10:11 AM      Profile for Tehanu     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Good news in Ontario about this:

quote:
Ontario pharmacists will be asked to stop collecting sensitive information about a woman's sexual activity before they dispense the so-called morning after pill.

The Ontario College of Pharmacists agreed yesterday to advise pharmacists not to use a controversial screening form to collect the information after privacy commissioner Ann Cavoukian complained following a report in the Toronto Star last week.

... Jane Pepino, chair of the Ontario Women's Health Council, called it "a good first step but Plan B must end up in front of the counter. We wanted women to have access to it without the kind of demeaning and intrusive questions such as the ones that had been asked. Thankfully, pharmacists have acceded to the request."


But there's still the rest of the country ...

Article in the Toronto Star.

[edited to remove sidescroll, oops][edited again because I still can't get the url to work, but the article's on the star website anyway (www.thestar.com)]

[ 08 December 2005: Message edited by: Tehanu ]


From: Desperately trying to stop procrastinating | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
kuri
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posted 08 December 2005 10:20 AM      Profile for kuri   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Maybe it would be a good idea for us to write our privacy dons as well....
From: an employer more progressive than rabble.ca | Registered: Jun 2003  |  IP: Logged
Michelle
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posted 08 December 2005 10:48 AM      Profile for Michelle   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Good for Cavoukian.

There is absolutely NO reason for women to have to fill out forms, or even to answer questions. That's absolutely ridiculous. No one has to fill out forms to get other behind-the-counter drugs that could potentially be disruptive to your body (as morning-after pills admittedly are).

There's such an easy way around this. If they want to make sure that women know what they're taking, then when a woman asks for the ECP, they can give it to them, with GENERAL instructions and warnings about it, and let the woman herself decide whether she falls into the category of people who can take it. So, they can tell her, just like with any other product, what the time frame is when it will be effective (and when it WON'T be effective), what to expect as side effects, and what type of sex can cause pregnancy (e.g. intercourse).

And then leave it to the woman to decide whether she fits the criteria. I mean, honestly, the solution is so easy that I can't help but think that this whole thing is more political than anything else.

[ 08 December 2005: Message edited by: Michelle ]


From: I've got a fever, and the only prescription is more cowbell. | Registered: May 2001  |  IP: Logged
idontandwontevergolf
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posted 08 December 2005 11:07 AM      Profile for idontandwontevergolf     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Edited by Michelle to take out impossibly long URL.

[ 08 December 2005: Message edited by: Michelle ]


From: Between two highways | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged
writer
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posted 08 December 2005 11:07 AM      Profile for writer     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Ouchy scroll!
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Tehanu
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posted 08 December 2005 11:33 AM      Profile for Tehanu     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Ouchy scroll indeed ... that was my problem, for some reason the url wasn't urling. Don't know if it's the Star's addressing or a problem with the babble url button (which has always worked before!)
From: Desperately trying to stop procrastinating | Registered: Jul 2005  |  IP: Logged
pogge
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posted 08 December 2005 11:36 AM      Profile for pogge   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
The Star's links are so long they occasionally break the software here. TinyURL is your friend. And ours.
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mamitalinda
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posted 08 December 2005 12:34 PM      Profile for mamitalinda   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Well, while we are all hating the pharmacies, I have to share a story about what happened to me when I tried to refill my regular ol' Birth Control prescription at Jean Coutu. I had just come back from NS, and with prescription in hand (with name and number of pharmacy at home) attempted to get the next month's pack. The attending pharmacist refused to fill it, saying that the prescription had to come from a local doctor (it doesn't, and I had confirmed this before leaving). She said that it was at her descretion whether or not to fill my order, and that she was deciding not to.

I hastened to point out that it was a Birth Control Pill, not a narcotic, and requested that she phone my home pharmacy, which was open 24 hrs a day. She refused. I had to go home, call my home pharmacy, and have them call the equivalent of Shoppers in Montreal to avoid further embarrassment/rage/wasting of my time.

I was, at that time, a new mom, in my final year of my degree, and certainly not in a position to be missing a day's BCP at the whim of a pharmacist. Thankfully, the Montreal Shoppers (forget what it's called) filled it without incident. I always wanted to make a big public fuss about it, but was so bogged down with exams etc. at the time that I couldn't. So this is my chance: Don't go to the Jean-Coutu at 501, Mont-Royal Blvd. East in the Plateau. The pharmacist there is an anti-woman woman. There, I have spoken my piece.


From: Babblers On Strike! | Registered: Apr 2004  |  IP: Logged
neoluddite
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posted 08 December 2005 01:03 PM      Profile for neoluddite     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
I'm appalled, but certainly not shocked by this. Things have slowly been going in this direction, and I expect it to get worse before it gets better.

I'm disappointed that so many other young women and girls have become complacent about reproductive rights. I've seen so many friends shrug off the issue-- they feel that the legal rights are already there, thus being too vocal about this "distasteful" issue brands them as "feminazis". Until they have a bad personal experience in actually exercising these legal rights, that is.

Disappointingly, it took recent a Law and Order:SVU episode to get the attention of one friend who always believed that pharmacists should be able to refuse parts of their job (ie, dispensing ECP) on moral/religious grounds.

(Background: The character on the show couldn't get ECP because the pharmacist refused on moral grounds. This set in motion a chain of events that saw her unable to get an in-state abortion without parental permission, going out-of-state only to be suckered by a fake abortion clinic that tricked women into waiting until it was no longer legally permitted, and then finally doing violence to her own body for lack of other options.)

My friend now believes that ALL pharmacists should be required to do their job and dispense ECP. Which is great. What sucks is that it was a TV show that opened her mind and not the dozens of thoughtful conversations we've had about it.


From: halifax | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged
Sineed
rabble-rouser
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posted 08 December 2005 09:18 PM      Profile for Sineed     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
A letter faxed to me today:

"Notice to Pharmacists

Re: Emergency Contraception Screening Form

Further to discussions with the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario, we are advising you not to use the 'Screening Form for Emergency Contraceptive Pills (ECPs)' produced by the Canadian Pharmacists Association...."

It goes on to say that we are still expected to provide appropriate information and counseling.

I disagree that "things are getting worse." Before ECPs were made non-prescription, women would come into the Shoppers where I used to work evening shifts, asking for the "morning after" pill. I'd have to send them next door, where there was a medical walk-in clinic. The woman would have to wait, sometimes for hours, to spend a couple of minutes with a doctor who would write the order on a prescription pad and then get to bill OHIP for the privilege.

I think the screening form was a consequence of clamouring from a tiny, but highly vocal, minority of pharmacists who believe that ECPs may be "abortifacient." Also, there were some doctors who were against pharmacists handing out ECPs. So I think the Canadian Pharmacists Association was trying to compromise. (I don't belong to this organization, so I'm guessing.)

Personally, I objected to the screening form and did not use it.


From: # 668 - neighbour of the beast | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
neoluddite
rabble-rouser
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posted 09 December 2005 12:03 PM      Profile for neoluddite     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
Originally posted by Sineed:

I disagree that "things are getting worse."

I should have been clearer-- I think things are getting worse in terms of the general state of reproductive rights for North American women. Not necessarily that ECP was harder to access-- in some limited ways, things are indeed getting better, at least for women in Canada.

But I do think that a combination of complacency and what's happening in the U.S. will not see us continuing to progress. I see great potential for erosion of reproductive rights within the current political/cultural climate. Unless we become more proactive in defending these rights, they may well slip away.


From: halifax | Registered: May 2005  |  IP: Logged
Sineed
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 11260

posted 09 December 2005 06:51 PM      Profile for Sineed     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
quote:
But I do think that a combination of complacency and what's happening in the U.S. will not see us continuing to progress. I see great potential for erosion of reproductive rights within the current political/cultural climate. Unless we become more proactive in defending these rights, they may well slip away.

I'm undecided about this. The rise to power of the religious right in the US has resulted, for my profession in the States, a trend towards letting pharmacists fill prescriptions "according to conscience;" that is, they can legally refuse to fill birth control pill prescriptions and ECP prescriptions if it's against their religion. In Ontario, a pharmacist can legally refuse to fill a prescription only for medical reasons; that is, if the prescription is medically inappropriate for some reason (eg, I refused to fill one that said "Percocet: take 25/day"). I'm not sure about other provinces.

On the other hand, if women's reproductive rights seem to be threatened, I think a lot of women would see this as a call to action. I have marched in pro-choice demonstrations before, when I was a student, and I would again. I still have the "Choice" buttons in a drawer, ready to be dusted off...


From: # 668 - neighbour of the beast | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged
Sineed
rabble-rouser
Babbler # 11260

posted 15 December 2005 07:50 PM      Profile for Sineed     Send New Private Message      Edit/Delete Post  Reply With Quote 
Dec. 15, 2005 update. I received an e-mail from the Ontario College of Pharmacists containing the following:

"Pharmacists should continue to seek information from the patient only as necessary to clarify the appropriateness of providing Plan B, keeping in mind the need to respect the individualís right to remain anonymous and to decline responding to personally sensitive questions."

Activism works


From: # 668 - neighbour of the beast | Registered: Dec 2005  |  IP: Logged

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